Volume 2, Issue 1, February 2017, Page: 16-20
Inclusive Education in Visually Impaired Children: Stakeholders Perspective
Anam Altaf, Department of Opthalmology, Eye Donors Organization (EDO), Wah Cantt, Pakistan
Ayesha Babar Kawish, Al-Shifa School of Public Health, Al-Shifa Trust Eye Hospital, Rawalpindi, Pakistan
Ishtiaq Anwar, Department of Opthalmology, Eye Donors Organization (EDO), Wah Cantt, Pakistan
Received: Dec. 22, 2016;       Accepted: Feb. 6, 2017;       Published: Mar. 2, 2017
DOI: 10.11648/j.rs.20170201.14      View  1133      Downloads  41
Abstract
Despite of great progress is being made towards the Education for All and Millennium development goals (MDGs) demonstrated by increase number of enrollments in schools, children with disabilities are still combating educational exclusion. Inclusive education is an educational system in which children with and without disabilities learns together. To explore the perceptions of stakeholders regarding inclusive education in visually impaired children and identify gaps in their perceptions. To identify the barriers in implementation of inclusive education. A qualitative study using 20 in depth interviews and one focus group discussion with stakeholders was carried out to explore perceptions of stakeholders. Theoretical frameworks; part of health policy triangle (actors) was used with human rights, social constructivism and symbolic interactionism. Pure grounded theory analysis was used to reach the findings. Purposive and snow ball sampling was used to approach relevant respondents. The theory that emerged from study was that “inclusive education is difficult to implement at grass root level in Pakistan, however at tertiary level (universities and colleges) of education inclusion can be implemented due to better brail training and mental stability”. Supporter explained their views in terms of participation, role of teachers, role of parents, benefits of inclusion, resources, awareness, level of education, equality and non discrimination. Non supporter explain their opinions in terms of financial instability, transport, parents selfish attitude, social stigma, psychological issue, initial training, limitation in selection of subjects and similar community. Inclusion implementation could show better results at stage of higher education. Financial instability and access to regular schools are main barrier for inclusion in Pakistan but meanwhile they believed that inclusion represent equity and non discrimination among visually impaired students.
Keywords
Visually Impaired, Inclusion, Stakeholders
To cite this article
Anam Altaf, Ayesha Babar Kawish, Ishtiaq Anwar, Inclusive Education in Visually Impaired Children: Stakeholders Perspective, Rehabilitation Science. Vol. 2, No. 1, 2017, pp. 16-20. doi: 10.11648/j.rs.20170201.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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